NW DAR promotes Constitution

From staff and press reports

Sept. 17 began the national celebration of Constitution Week. The week-long commemoration of America’s most important document is one of the country’s least known official observances.

The Constitution stands as a testament to the tenacity of Americans throughout history to maintain their liberties and freedom, and to ensure those inalienable rights to every American. In recognition of that, the Nanih Waiya DAR recently had Louisville Mayor Will Hill recognize Constitution Week with a proclamation and history teacher Judy Sanders will host a DAR event in front of the courthouse Sept. 19.

Sanders and some of her students are challenging each citizen to stop by and take a short survey about the Constitution. Sanders and the students will be at the court house Wednesday September 19 from 9 a.m. to noon. She is requesting everyone but especially community leaders, business owners, general public and elected officials to come by and meet her students and take the short survey.

The tradition of celebrating the Constitution started many years ago and began with the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). In 1955, the Daughters petitioned Congress to set aside Sept. 17-23 annually to be dedicated for the observance of Constitution Week. The resolution was later adopted by the U.S. Congress and signed into Public Law No. 915 on Aug. 2, 1956, by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

The aims of the celebration are to: (1) emphasize citizens’ responsibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution, preserving it for posterity; (2) inform the people that the Constitution is the basis for America’s great heritage and the foundation for our way of life; and (3) encourage the study of the historical events which led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787.

The United States of America functions as a Republic under the Constitution, which is the oldest document still in active use that outlines the self-government of a people. This landmark idea that men had the inalienable right as individuals to be free and live their lives under their own governance was the impetus of the American Revolution. Today, the Constitution stands as an icon of freedom for people around the world.

“We must remember and teach that those who wrote the Constitution believed that no government can create freedom, but that government must guard freedom rather than encroach upon the freedoms of its people,” stated Merry Ann T. Wright, President General of the DAR

DAR has served America for 122 years as its foremost cheerleader. In 1928, the Daughters began work on a building as a memorial to the Constitution. Today, DAR Constitution Hall is the only structure erected in tribute to the Constitution of the United States of America.

Known as the largest women’s patriotic organization in the world, DAR has over 165,000 members with approximately 3,000 chapters in all 50 states and 11 foreign countries. The DAR has long promoted patriotism through commemorative celebrations, memorials, scholarships and activities for children, and programs for new immigrants.