Dedication held in memory of soldier

From press reports

On Saturday May 24, 2014, descendants and their friends gathered at Webster Cemetery on Highway 25 north of Louisville to dedicate at Confederate Memorial tombstone for Samuel M. Bateman, Sr.
Samuel was a private in Co. F, 5th Mississippi Infantry and is buried in an unmarked grave in Vicksburg, MS, where he died on or about May 24, 1863.

Left to Right: Herbert Bateman, Beth Hemphill, Herman Bateman, Frances Woodruff and Franklin Woodruff prepare to dedicate a Memorial Confederate Tombstone for Samuel M. Bateman, Sr.  Herbert and Herman are great grandsons, Beth is a fourth great granddaughter and Franklin is a third great grandson. Frances is the President of the Winston Guards 2643 UDC and did the dedication service.

Left to Right: Herbert Bateman, Beth Hemphill, Herman Bateman, Frances Woodruff and Franklin Woodruff prepare to dedicate a Memorial Confederate Tombstone for Samuel M. Bateman, Sr.  Herbert and Herman are great grandsons, Beth is a fourth great granddaughter and Franklin is a third great grandson. Frances is the President of the Winston Guards 2643 UDC and did the dedication service.

Samuel was born about 1816 in Tennessee. He and his wife Margaret left Tennessee and were in Alabama in 1842, in 1850 they were living in Chickasaw County Mississippi and in th3 1860 census they were living at Webster, Winston County, MS.
Samuel was a veteran of the Second Seminole War of 1836. He first joined Captain H. L. Halfacre’s Company known as the Winston Brothers. They were officially the 5th Regiment Mississippi Volunteers, 60-day Troops and were formed in Webster. When Captain Halfacre’s company was disbanded he joined Company F, 5th Regiment State Troops on August 25, 1862, in Louisville.
The dedication was arranged by Winston Guards 2543 United Daughters of the Confederacy®, the Beauregard Rifles 951 Children of the Confederacy®, and the Captain John M. Bradley Camp 384 Sons of Confederate Veterans all of Louisville.
The program began with the entrance of a color guard of Confederate Re-enactors from Gordo, Al, Starkville, Columbus and Louisville. The group is known as the Alisppi Rifles.
Mrs. Frances Woodruff, President of the Winston Guards welcomed everyone to the dedication and David Holder, Chaplain of the Captain John M. Bradley Camp, gave the invocation. Mrs. Woodruff then led the group in the UDC Ritual, Pledge to the American flag and salutes to the flag of Mississippi and the Confederate flag.
Mrs. Woodruff then read the biography of Samuel M. Bateman, Sr., and the dedication of the tombstone. Placing the wreath on the site were Herb and Herman Batemen, great great grandsons and Beth Hemphill a fourth great granddaughter. The color guard then gave a three volley salute. Each of member of the color guard then approached the tombstone for a silent military salute with Franklin Woodruff the third great grandson and member of the color guard coming last to do the last drink ceremony.
The children of Samuel and Margaret were: Mary G. born 1837 in Tennessee; Frances a. born I September 1839 in Tennessee married W. B. Rainey and an unknown Williams (Frances and W. B. Rainey are buried in Webster Cemetery near her brother and mother) she died in 1927; Nancy Ophelia born 1842 in Alabama married John Peterson and remarried Samuel Clardy after John’s death; Samuel Jr. born April 29, 1844 like his father served in the Confederate Army he died December 13, 1876 and is buried next to his mother in Webster Cemetery; Joseph S. was born in 1846 and married R. Green August 16, 1872; George W. born 1850 and Sarah Elizabeth married C. w. Rayburn December 12, 1872.